Homemade Egg Noodles

Last night, I made homemade egg noodles, one of my favorites. They are very easy to make, and don’t require any special equipment. First, I made the noodles, then cooked them, and then made homemade chicken alfredo with them. My housecat, Kitty, helped….well, sort of.  Anyway, let’s learn a little about the humble noodle, and then we’ll move on to makin’ em.

A few noodle facts:

  • The oldest evidence of noodles is about 2000BC in China.
  • In the early 1700s, the first spaghetti was made in Italy.
  • Until the advent of tomato sauce, noodles were eaten with the hand. It is thought that the addition of sauce to the noodles prompted people to start using forks.
  • In 1789, Thomas Jefferson brought the first macaroni maker from France to America.
  • In Chinese culture, noodles are thought to bring longevity. It is more common at birthday parties to serve noodles than birthday cake.
  • Today, about 40% of the flour used in Asia, is for manufacture of noodles.
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Ingredients:

  • 2 cups all purpose or whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup water
Prep Time: 20 Minutes Difficulty: Easy Servings: 4

In a medium bowl mix together the flour,

and salt.

Add the egg yolks and egg.

Stir together well. Mixture will be crumbly.

Add 1/3 to 1/2  cup water.

Stir the water and dry ingredients thoroughly. If dough is too dry, add enough water to make it easy to handle. If you add too much water, it’s ok, just add flour until it is easy to handle(not sticky).

Sprinkle flour over your work surface, and turn dough out of the bowl.

Use your hands to flatten it out some.

And then, using a rolling pin, roll the dough out until its 1/8 inch or less.  If it sticks to your work surface, gently peel it back and throw some flour where it’s sticking.

Here’s my helper. She tried. (Good thing we’re boiling the noodles.)

Later she got distracted, and wasn’t much help.

Anyhow, back to the noodles. When done rolling the dough out, you’re ready for the fun part: cutting the dough into noodles. You can use a knife, but I’ve found that a pizza cutter works best.

Cut them in strips from 1/8 up to ½ inch wide, depending on how big or small you want your noodles.  Then cut across the noodles the other direction for  the length. Again, it’s up to you. For short noodles I cut them about 2 inches. For spaghetti type, cut about  8 inches.

If you want to store your noodles and cook them later, hang the noodles on a drying rack, or leave them on your work surface until completely dry(they can be easily removed with a spatula), and then store in the fridge for a few days, or in the freezer for several weeks. It you are cooking them right away, bring 4 quarts of water to boil in a large saucepan. Gently remove the noodles from your work surface with a spatula, and place on a plate.

Add noodles to boiling water, and reduce to a simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 5-7 minutes.

Noodles will be firm, but tender. Drain the noodles,

and add spaghetti sauce,  or just butter and seasoning as a side dish.

I’ve used these noodles to make spaghetti, or chicken noodle soup, or side dish with butter added.  I’ve also added fresh cut up basil (about a tablespoon) in with the dry ingredients at the start of the recipe, or you could use dry(a teaspoon or less) herbs or seasoning. The world is your oyster – add whatever your tastebuds wish for.

Last night, I used the noodles for homemade chicken alfredo.  After the noodles were drained, I returned them to the pot, and added a half stick of melted butter,

3/4 cup heavy cream,

some leftover cooked chicken,

and pepper to taste.

Serve it up and enjoy!

26 comments to Homemade Egg Noodles

  • Now, I’m hungry. That looks delicious! I shouldn’t read your blog right before lunch!

  • Glenda

    Harland must be working hard to burn off those calories! Looks great.

    • Suzanne

      Hi Glenda,
      Actually, he is on business travel. I woudn’t have made this if he was home since he’s sworn off butter and cream since he started his diet. I’m enjoying it though!

  • I have my grandmother’s noodle recipe. I’m definitely going to try some of the varieties you’ve mentioned.

  • Janet

    Cool, I make these noodles too, but I’ve only ever put them in chicken noodle soup…my interest is seriously piqued! I might have to make this tomorrow, since I have leftover rotisserie chicken already in the fridge (no idea how that happened…oh yeah, I bought two) I’ve never known what the actual measurements are, it’s nice to have them written down. I’m going to actually try them out and see if they are the same as mine are just thrown together. Looks delicious!

  • You made making your own noodles sound easy. (I have never made noodles before.)

  • These look so yummy…..thanks for the recipe 🙂

  • lynette

    Great blog! I love reading about the American Mid West, especially farming. More old fasioned American housewife recipes please!

    • Suzanne

      Hi Lynette,
      Glad you stopped by. I’ve been doing so much stuff outside lately, that I haven’t been cooking much, but plan on doing more soon, I promise.
      Suzanne

  • Suzanne…you rock! I am going to make these egg noodles for my kids! I can just see their faces when they bite into these noodles. Their FAVORITE thing to eat is cooked pasta or noodles (any kind, any shape) with butter and salt and pepper! You are a good cook! You should post some more recipes!!

    • Suzanne

      Hi Bonnie,
      I need to get in the kitchen, but during the summer, I don’t cook as much. I am going to post a recipe for refrigerator pickles soon, and need to do a post about homemade pie crust.
      Happy pasta making. 🙂
      Suzanne

  • Mary Laymon

    Hello to Window on the World:
    I have been making “noodles” for about 65 years. I learned from my Grandmother and Mother. Almost every Sunday, my Mother had a boiled pot roast (beef). When the roast was cooked it was removed and the broth was brought to a boil. The noodles were put into the boiling broth and cooked until done. Mother pulled the roast into chunks and put it with the noodles………I divide my noodle dough into 2 balls and roll them out one at a time. I make sure that the top of dough is dusted with flour and then I roll the dough up like a jelly roll, then I slice the roll into thin slices, shake them out to have long noodles and leave them on the counter to dry and then into the pot they go……this is a family favorite……yummy!

  • Well yum! That is exactly how I make my noodles. Delicious!

  • Frosty

    home made noodles are a must here as we dont care for the store bought.. i love making them.. i saw you were cutting them using a pizza cutter, that is what i use too.. i sometimes use my crinkle cutter too.. that makes a pretty presentation for the holidays…

  • I have seen noodles made with a pasta maker, but I don’t have one. I knew there must be a way to just roll them out. Now I have to try this. Thanks for posting.

  • Holy cow, holy cow, holy cow!!! Is it REALLY that easy? Really, really? Pinkie-swear?

    I hope so, because my husband’s birthday is tomorrow and he is a pasta fanatic and I am going to try this!! WISH ME LUCK!

  • Carel

    Your noodles look delicious! The recipe I use is hit and miss, sometimes they come out good and other times there tough, I haven’t figured out what the problem is since I do everything the same each time. Well I’m definately going to try yours, I’ll post how they come out. Thanks for your site, I’ve really enjoyed it, I stumbled upon it somehow and its now a favorite!

  • Annette Hawkins

    What a wonderful site that I just stumbled upon while Prairie Woman Cooks, also useful home cooking recipes with easy fun personal comments, like yours! Thank you for sharing your life experiences about your family and your neighbors. Tearful, yet joyful part of life that stays in your heart forever, along with the beautiful roses and your photographs prove that. Thank You

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